Eggshell Calcium for Dogs

 

Dogs need naturally sourced calcium for healthy bones, nerves and muscles.

Calcium also helps normalize the function of nerves and muscles, helps regulate heartbeat, normalizes blood clotting and helps promote healthy skin and hair. It is also important in immunological activity of cells.

When you are unable to feed your dog’s raw bones for calcium, eggshells are the next best thing in nature to provide bio-available calcium, magnesium, phosphorous and other trace minerals your dog needs for optimal health.  

Ensuring our carnivore companions get enough calcium is extremely important and not all calcium supplements are easily digestible or absorbable for our dogs and cats. If you don’t feed a prey model diet then adding some other species specific calcium to the diet is crucial to balancing the high phosphorus content of meat.

More than 10 years of research have shown that eggshells are the ideal source of bio-available calcium (dense and well absorbed). Studies also showed accelerated healing when using eggshells for treating such orthopedic diseases as congenital dislocation of a hip or osteoporosis (softening of the bones).

An eggshell contains over 90 percent calcium and is a natural source of 27 different minerals such as: magnesium, phosphorus, silicon, sodium, potassium, iron, sulfur,copper, zinc, florine, phosphorus, chromium and molybdenum. The composition of eggshells resembles teeth and bones, which makes it easy for the body to absorb. Also the protein of a shell is composed of such essential amino acids as methionine, cysteine, lysine, isoleucine. This makes eggshells an effective natural means to obtain calcium.

Thus, properly prepared eggshells are the most balanced natural means to obtain calcium second only to raw, soft bones for our carnivore companions.

Make Your Own Eggshell Calcium

  1. Begin with truly Free Range Eggs if at all possible. Rinse egg shells (optional) with clean water.
  2. Dry the shells – Leave on a cookie sheet out in the sunshine, on a counter OR  inside a gas oven with a pilot light (no other heat source needed) until they are dry. Do NOT COOK or heat them!  It is important that they are completely dry and brittle before you gind them so they don’t grow bacteria when stored.
  3. Put the dryed egg shells in your coffee grinder, food processor or blender and grind them until they are a powder with no large pieces
  4. If you are unable to find pasture raised chicken eggs, or if simply don’t have the time to make your own, I suggest Eggshellent Calcium.  I for one am not raising my own chickens at this time and don’t eat or use enough eggs to make my own powder so I LOVE this eggshell calcium powder!

 

Eggshellent Calcium

High Potency, Bioavailable,  Eggshell Calcium for Dogs

 

Eggshellent Calcium Supplement

 

*Eggshellent Calcium is the animal origin alternative to raw meaty bones or bone meal as a calcium supplement.

Eggshellent Calcium is made of 100% finely powdered heavy metal free eggshells. There are no fillers or additives, just pure eggshell powder providing approximately 1900 mg. of calcium per teaspoon.

Eggshellent Calcium is the first animal origin calcium supplemental alternative to bone as a calcium supplement for your dogs diet.


EggShellent Calcium



Testimonies/Product Reviews

“It saved my Chausie’s life!
I finally found a tastless supplement my fading Chausie would consume. At 12 years old she was near death deprived of nutrition because of her stubborn appetite. Her frail body is now solid and healthy. She has a new “leash” on life and I have my baby back. I thank God I found this stuff. I rate it 5 out of 5 stars!”
Terri, Jacksonville, FL

“Nothing Else Like it! A terrific product.
I am a breeder. It is so important for the mommies while feeding the puppies to have a natural source of calcium. I even put Eggshellent on all my own raw food to balance phosphorous and to provide extra calcium. It is the best! I give it 5 stars”
Audrey Caywood Virginia


I would love to hear YOUR testimonies! You can email me at: info@thewholedog.org

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